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The recent story is predictable: bands, upgrading gear, teaching guitar all over town, more bands, shitty gig nights with shitty promoters, degree at Goldsmiths University, more song writing, and eventually, present day.


Daniel Tissingh began playing a found and broken classical guitar – repaired by a Venezuelan electrician – spending his pre-teen years in community housing in southern Spain with the constant ebb and flow of diverging nationalities and ages, and myriad musical delights: the country’s own Spanish radio-pop cheese-fests, evangelical Christian metal and, well, all the something-in-between.  At 14 he used his saved pocket money to buy a 30 watt amp, 2 plectrums, a lead and a very rusty-stringed fake strat. Though a certain element of taste had still to be established, the love for lyric, chord and melody was unquenchable.


Thus begat bands, upgrading gear, teaching guitar all over town, more bands, shitty gig nights with shitty promoters, degree at Goldsmiths University, more song writing.


Some stand out moments include headlining the Camden Assembly (formerly Barfly) with former project The Quiet Days, recording and performing with Drum Works for both the Barbican main stage and the BBC’s 10 Pieces show, a Goldsmiths Vocal Ensemble performance at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, and session work playing live at the BBC’s Maida Vale studios.


Which brings us to present day: Whisper Anthem.


The latest is a five track EP entitled The Road You Walk, which was released on Friday the 4th of November last year. Produced by long-term collaborator Daniel Moyler this is the first body of work since their warmly received full-length album early last year. Recorded in the contrasting arenas of Miloco Studios and dingy home set-ups, the EP merges two live vocal/acoustic performances, live rhythm section, and a heap of harmony overdubs. It was delivered through 4 weekly-released singles, each inspired by life’s most common interactions: friend, family, partner, and stranger. The Road You Walk invites them all (in that order) to the same banquet - a respite on life’s worn path - to celebrate the commonality of our struggle and existence. Perhaps, we are more alike than we are different?